Articles

Friday, August 14, 2009 - 12:36pm

At an age when many would want to take it easy, retired physician Joseph Woo Jr. is kicking it up a notch. He has volunteered to be a faculty member at UCSF Fresno, which trains about 190 resident physicians on the Community Regional Medical Center campus each year.

Dr. Woo just turned 85 and decided reaching out to new physicians would be a fulfilling new chapter in his career and life, so he applied and was accepted to the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program as an assistant clinical professor.


Tuesday, August 11, 2009 - 12:37pm

Fifteen nursing students at Community Medical Centers received $3,000 scholarships through the Alice A. Peters Nursing Scholarship Fund. The fund is designed to lessen the financial burden and help nursing students complete their studies on schedule. The scholarships are awarded to nursing students who are already Community Medical Centers employees.

The awards ceremony was held on Aug. 11 at Community Regional Medical Center in downtown Fresno.


Thursday, August 6, 2009 - 12:38pm

A special technique aimed at giving heart patients a more comfortable alternative to traditional angiograms is now being performed at Community Regional Medical Center in downtown Fresno.

The transradial angiogram is a special procedure where surgeons place catheters to the heart through the radial artery, or wrist, instead of the femoral artery, or groin. Community Regional is the Valley’s only hospital offering this option.


Tuesday, August 4, 2009 - 12:40pm

Epilepsy is a neurological seizure disorder that effects 50 million people worldwide, and left untreated can be life threatening. But in most cases, it can be treated.

“Our goal at Community Medical Centers is not only to control the disease itself, but also to give patients a better lifestyle,” said Dr. Loveneet Singh, director of epilepsy and neurodiagnostics at Community Regional Medical Center in downtown Fresno.


Friday, July 31, 2009 - 12:41pm

Kelly Speigle has been a housekeeper at Community Behavioral Health Center for six months – but hasn't exactly followed a typical career path. The near death of his oldest child compelled him to seek out a position in health care, specifically at Community Medical Centers.

This summer, as he watches 5-year old Connor play T-ball, Speigle reminisces on the miracle of his son and what the staff at Clovis Community Medical Center did to save Connor’s life and make sure wife Amanda was OK.