In the Public Eye

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Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 1:49pm

If you’re in a smashup, have a burst appendix or heart attack – there are many rooms in a specialized hospital department that are gateways to life-saving care.  But I’m told I can’t call that place an ED. It’s still got to be called an ER. That’s because pharmaceutical companies have hijacked “ED” with certain TV ads (invariably at dinner time, prompting questions from young minds about a certain condition lasting an undesired and unhealthy four hours).
 


In the Public Eye

Friday, August 9, 2013 - 12:43pm

In 208 seconds, he navigated a life-saving landing of his crippled passenger jet onto New York City’s icy Hudson River in January 2009. Whether he’s striding into a room packed with 2,000 health executives or calmly sitting behind a table signing “Sully” into one of his books, Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger is spare in his choice of words, relentless in delineating what’s important and self-effacing in using the headlines he’s earned to reach audiences worldwide.


Thursday, August 1, 2013 - 1:32pm

To some, he’s a visionary. Others think he’s blowing up a bridge people are still walking on. Truth is, pediatrician Donald Berwick used the bridge metaphor quite powerfully in his presentation at an American Hospital Association health summit in San Diego.


Wednesday, July 24, 2013 - 10:43am

I was a big naysayer. I mean, who holds a breakfast event at Fresno’s Chaffee Zoo to unveil an economic analysis of why hospitals in Fresno and Madera counties are crucial to the well-being of the Valley? But – what a success!

The July 19 event drew 200 people (more than those who originally registered), the three speakers were well received, the early blast of summer sun didn’t begin to spread into the grassy amphitheater until presentations were nearly done – and the good-vibe lingered afterward as folks took a brisk stroll through the zoo.


Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 9:34am

The overall ambulance experience – which was a good one, a rescue vehicle for a loved one in need – came with a bill of nearly $900. It included a $72 charge for the four-mile drive from house to hospital.


Monday, July 1, 2013 - 10:34am

It was a relic hospital in a crime- and poverty-ridden Brooklyn neighborhood. And it was where I took my first job after graduating college, opting to do "community relations" instead of doing public relations for General Foods in posh Westchester County.