In the Public Eye

jtaylor's picture
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 - 11:54am

What would your doctor see if you let him poke around your house with no restrictions? Think about it. When you hire a Realtor, you usually tidy up before a get-acquainted tour. When you’re on the market – and your house isn’t a full-time dump – you don’t leave last night’s leftovers in the sink before going to work.

But if you doctor determined today was the date for your annual house physical – unannounced – what would he find?

In the Public Eye

Friday, January 3, 2014 - 11:49am

He stood typing on a keyboard behind the United Airlines counter. He flashed me a look. “You don’t really see me,” he said, “because I’m not really here.” So much for asking about changing flights. Soon, I’d be watching him trying to queue up folks to board a plane – so clueless that other United staff had to do his work for him.  So much for United's “bug off” brand of customer service in San Francisco.

Friday, December 6, 2013 - 3:21pm

It’s 4 a.m. About 40 emails have accumulated since I last checked my phone six hours ago --- news alerts, various listserves, political updates.

It’s 5:30 a.m. If I’m lucky, the delivery driver has left three newspapers at my door – the Fresno Bee, New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Print is not dead, but some days it takes three papers in a blue bag to keep the wind from blowing the contents away. Before I head to work at 6:30 a.m., I will have read two, saving the Journal for later.

Monday, November 4, 2013 - 12:58pm

Has the word “patient” outworn its usefulness? That question surfaced some months back at a Mayo Clinic symposium focusing on having patients take greater responsibility for their own care (or should I say “wellness?”).

The noun suggests one thing, the adjective something else again. Are folks awaiting medical care actually long-suffering, uncomplaining? (if yes, does that mean they are “compliant,” if no does that mean they’re an obstacle until handed off?)

Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 9:09am

Oxymoron: Memorable, positive PowerPoint presentation. Truth is we remember the truly bad ones. A PowerPoint is a tool, not a truckload of words and graphics. I’ve seen a bunch recently, and two stand out in contrasting content and the styles of their presenters.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 - 8:29am

Conference speakers tend to have a compass with three needles -- poking fun,  jabbing fingers or revving up encouragement. Dr. Eric Coleman nailed two of them in a presentation about the importance of hospitals investing n high-quality transitional care.

Hospitals, like Community Medical Centers, that have skilled nursing facilities will soon be penalized under the Affordable Care Act for what he called care-sensitive, preventable readmissions.