In the Public Eye

jtaylor's picture
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:44am

Terry Bradshaw was never a scrambler in his glory days as Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback. Boy, is he making up for that now as a TV game analyst and public speaker. He recently forced his arthritic legs onto a platform in front of several hundred hospital executives in Monterey at a Hospital Council summit – and his remarks occasionally sounded like a mad fourth-quarter dash to-and-fro to get a score.


In the Public Eye

Wednesday, January 17, 2007 - 10:13am

I asked a Valley congressman last year what it would take for Congress to make significant changes in the nation's dysfunctional health care system.  It'll happen, he said, when General Motors and the other large industries lobby Capitol Hill as a coalition, demanding action.


Well, GM doesn't have the clout it once did, but a pent-up frustration with high cost, sometimes questionable quality and increasing numbers of sick, uninsured people still making our tossed salads has created unusual partnerships at the state and national level.


Thursday, January 11, 2007 - 10:29am

An important part of Community's mission is improving everyone's health. So, when government considers changes in health policy, chances are Community will feel the impact. Sometimes Community will be leading or supporting the effort, and other times it will express concern.

You'd expect that from the region's largest private employer and its safety net.  My job as director of public affairs is to provide research and support for Community's leadership team and Board of Trustees on political and community affairs.


Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 9:15am

Nearly 47 million Americans are uninsured. The first year of cancer treatment costs Americans $2.3 billion in time lost to travel, and waiting for and receiving treatment.  We get hammered with so much bad news daily that it's fair to wonder why we should get out of bed.


Thank God for New York City. Last December it became the nation's first major city to drastically limit PHVOs (how's that for a snickerdoodle of an acronymn?) at its 20,000-plus restaurants.