Making Care Accessible

Creating brighter smiles, making dental care more accessible

More than 14% of Valley children younger than age 11 have never been treated by a dentist, despite the fact that tooth decay is the single most common childhood health problem – five times more frequent than asthma. Untreated childhood dental problems can lead to difficulty chewing, swallowing and speaking, needless pain and lost school days.

The right place, right time for Prompt Care Clinic

Patients at one of California’s busiest emergency departments now have an alternative for non-life-threatening health conditions. Community Regional Medical Center has opened a Prompt Care Clinic on its campus with extended hours to treat walk-in patients for health issues such as like flu symptoms lacerations, minor broken bones and the need for X-rays or medication refills.

Community and UCSF partner to expand Valley access to pediatric care

Community Medical Centers and University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center (UCSF) have signed a formal Letter of Intent to significantly expand pediatric specialty care and the pediatric medical education program at Community hospitals and clinics.

Understanding is key to making care accessible

Soua Xiong’s hospital room was eerily empty so Jane Lee, a Hmong interpreter at Community Regional Medical Center, poked her head in to check on this patient and chat for a while. Normally Hmong elders are attended by their children or grandchildren, explained Lee, so a room empty of visitors should be an alert for staff to pay a bit more attention. 

Giving new urgency to emergency care

California’s hospitals report nearly 13 million emergency department patient encounters a year. With the number of hospitals with emergency care decreasing statewide from 365 to 330 since 2000, and the number of patients increasing by 35% during the same time period, those seeking care can experience long waits. Community is working in a number of ways to expedite treatment – especially at its busiest hospital, Community Regional Medical Center.

Continuing a commitment to care for the uninsured

Two potentially important health insurance events occur for some Valley residents in November.

Dialysis: Providing a life-saving service

A machine keeps Charles Lewis alive. For 12 hours each week – every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday – Lewis treks to Community Medical Centers’ outpatient dialysis center on the campus of Community Regional Medical Center where a hemodialysis dialysis machine filters toxins from his blood. Sometimes his treatments last as long as five hours.

“It’s like going to a part-time job.” Lewis said.

Growing Chaplains for the Valley

Hospital patients respond better to care when their spiritual needs are addressed, but until recently the closest chaplain training program was three hours away. To fill that need, Community collaborated with local hospitals, faith-based educators and Stanford University to establish Clinical Pastoral Education of Central California.

Gift gives Mothers Resource Center new life

New mother Stephanie Stone spent months reading how best to care for her baby, but when little Mia was born, all the books in the world left her feeling helpless when it came to breastfeeding.

“I didn’t know what to do. I felt awful because it felt like I was starving her,” Stone said.

That’s when Stone turned to the Mother’s Resource Center at Community Regional Medical Center – the only place in central California where mothers can find top experts who specialize in helping new parents like Stone.

Clovis Community multi-million expansion nears completion

The last milestones of Clovis Community Medical Center’s $300 million-plus expansion project unfolded this spring, leaving just a few final touches for the project’s culmination this fall.